asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
Zoom Info
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
Zoom Info

asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb

Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.

As I listened to the women I interviewed for the Conscious Weddings E-Course talk about the symptoms of their engagement anxiety, something sounded familiar. They talked about feeling physically sick, not being able to eat or sleep, being so filled with fear that it affected every aspect of their life, praying for a way out. I thought about my clients who question their very foundation of life, from their identity to their relationships with friends and family. At the end of one of the interviews I said, “You know, it sounds like you’re describing pregnancy and labor,” to which Erin (from the MP3 interview in Lesson 1) who happened to be pregnant at the time of the interview responded, “Yes, that’s exactly how it felt. Except so much worse because there was no room to be scared. At least with labor people expect you to be scared.” And there’s the critical difference between engagement/wedding anxiety and labor: when you express fears about childbirth no one says, “Oh, come on. Don’t be scared. It’s going to be the best day of your life! Maybe your fear means you don’t really want to become a mother.” Everyone understands that childbirth is terrifying and becoming a mother is the biggest transition of your life. But with an engagement and impending marriage, any expression of fear or doubt is met with, “Oh, come on. Don’t be scared. It’s going to be the best day of your life! Maybe your fear means you don’t really want to get married.” It’s the default response and it’s one that sends an already anxious bride or groom into doubt-overload. Our expectations determine our perceptions; when you’re expecting to be happier than you’ve ever been, there’s no room for the normal and necessary fear that often makes an appearance.

Engagement Anxiety is Like Being in Labor

I love how I talked about EA and pregnancy being comparable in an earlier post and then I stumbled across this

(via riotgrrrlact)

اللَّهُمَّ إِنِّي أَعُوذُ بِكَ مِنْ الْهَمِّ وَالْحُزْنِ وَالْعَجْزِ وَالْكَسَلِ , وَالْبُخْلِ وَالْجُبْنِ وَضَلَعِ الدَّيْنِ ,وَغَلَبَةِ الرِّجَالِ

pearlsofislam:

Allahumma inni a’udhu bika minal-hammi wal-Huzni wal-‘ajazi wal-kasli wal-bukhli wal-jubni wa dala’id-dayni waghalabatir-rijal.

[O Allaah, I take refuge in You from anxiety and sorrow, weakness and laziness, miserliness and cowardice, the burden of debts and from being over powered by men]

[Sahih Al-Bukhari, 7/158]

I’m never gonna wait
that extra twenty minutes
to text you back,
and I’m never gonna play
hard to get
when I know your life
has been hard enough already.
When we all know everyone’s life
has been hard enough already
it’s hard to watch
the game we make of love,
like everyone’s playing checkers
with their scars,
saying checkmate
whenever they get out
without a broken heart.
Just to be clear
I don’t want to get out
without a broken heart.
I intend to leave this life
so shattered
there’s gonna have to be
a thousand separate heavens
for all of my flying parts.

Andrea Gibson (via feellng)

Lately I’ve been thinking about who I want to love, and how I want to love, and why I want to love the way I want to love, and what I need to learn to love that way, and who I need to become to become the kind of love I want to be…and when I break it all down, when I whittle it into a single breath, it essentially comes out like this: Before I die, I want to be somebody’s favorite hiding place, the place they can put everything they know they need to survive, every secret, every solitude, every nervous prayer, and be absolutely certain I will keep it safe. I will keep it safe.

Andrea Gibson (via theunquotables)